Exportando uma VM do Virtualbox para o Xen Hypervisor

O Virtualbox e o Xen são dois sistema de virtualização distintos porém muito poderosos para determinadas aplicações.

A dificuldade maior encontrada é quando precisamos exportar uma VM do Virtualbox para o Xen. Depois de muita pesquisa e horas de trabalho, descobri que a forma mais adequada de importar uma VM do Virtualbox ( VDI ) para o Xen é através da conversão do VDI para um VMDK ( Vmware ).

Convertendo os formatos de VDI para VMDK
Primeiramente precisamos converter o formato do arquivo da máquina virtual de VDI para VMDK. Para isto na máquina que você possui o Virtualbox instalado procure pela aplicação VBoxManage. Através dela iremos converter os formatos da VM conforme modelo abaixo.

VBoxManage clonehd "" --format vmdk

Importando o VMDK no Xen
Depois de converter o seu arquivo VDI ( Virtualbox ) para o formato VMDK ( VMWare ) você deve utilziar o Xen Center para importar a VM no seu servidor Xen. Para isto basta abrir o Xen Center assim como screenshot abaixo:

xencenter

Depois disto é só esperar algumas horas até que a tarefa seja concluída. Lembre-se de ter espaço em disco o suficiente para importar sua VM.

Editando os dados do About do Mac OS

Neste artigo iremos editar os dados do About do Mac. Isto serve principalmente para você que montou seu hackintosh
Artigo em inglês

Running either UserDSDT or Easybeast with Multibeast will automatically identify your computer as a 2008 Mac Pro, because the Mac Pro (3,1) system definition is installed by default. To recap, system definitions pretend that your Hackintosh is a real Mac, enabling a variety of model-specific features in Mac OS X. However, if you don’t think that your “About This Mac” page is glamorous enough, it’s actually possible to edit this system definition information.

Change the icon
By default, “About This Mac” will display a generic icon of whatever Mac model your Hackintosh is pretending to be. However, you can change this by replacing the icon with a different one. To find these icons in your own Mac OS X file system, open Finder, and go to:

/System/Library/CoreServices/CoreTypes.bundle/Contents/Resources

NOTE: In the CoreServices folder, you will have to right-click the file “CoreTypes.bundle” and click “Show Package Contents”.

Once you reach this “Resources” folders, you’ll be able to get large, HD icons for various Apple products, including Macs, iPhones, iPads, and more. Each of these icons is 512×512 in size. Find the icon that your “About This Mac” page is currently using. You can either delete this icon, or drag it out to your desktop (or somewhere else random) as a backup.

Next, find an image that you want to use on your “About This Mac” page instead. It should be at least 256×256 in size. The image should also be transparent, which means that the background of the image has to be blank (not just white in color). If you know how to, you can also make your own transparent image. For reference, this is the image that I’m currently using.

Mac OS X uses the .icns format for its icons, instead of normal image formats like PNG or GIF. To fix this, once you have an image prepared, go to iConvertIcons.com, and choose the “Use Online” option. Upload your image, and click “Convert”. Once the website finishes converting your file, click “Download .icns” to download the .icns version of your image.

Rename your new icon to the name of the old icon that you dragged out from the “Resources” folder earlier. If you’re using the default Mac Pro (3,1) system definition, you’ll rename your new icon to “com.apple.macpro.icns” (without quotation marks).

Finally, drag your new icon into the Resources folder, and log out. You’re done!

Changing the name
By default, “About This Mac” calls your Hackintosh a Mac. For instance, if you have the Mac Pro (3,1) system definition installed, “About This Mac” will say “Mac Pro Early 2008”. You can change this by editing a properties list (plist) inside Mac OS X. First off, download TextWrangler. The plist file that you need to edit for this cannot be rendered properly in TextEdit or most other text editors.

Next, enable showing of hidden files. Then, open Finder, and go to:

/Users/”Your User”/Library/Preferences

NOTE: “Your User” represents the name of your user account in Mac OS X. To open hidden folders, you may have to right-click the folder and click “Open”.

Inside the “Preferences” folder, search for the file “com.apple.SystemProfiler.plist” (without the quotation marks). Open this file with TextWrangler.

The exact composition of your plist file depends on which system definition you’re using. Replace the appropriate names with the names that you wish to use instead. For instance, if you’re using the Mac Pro (3,1) definition, replace “Mac Pro (Early 2008)” with “Hackintosh (Early 2011)” or whatever else you want the name to be. You may have to replace multiple instances of each name.

Save the file, and log out. You’re done!

Conclusion
Once you log back in, click the Apple on the upper left-hand corner of your screen, click “About This Mac”, and then click “More Info”. You will now see your new icon and system name displayed. Hooray!

 

This is a purely cosmetic change; as far as Mac OS X is concerned, you’re still using a normal system definition. Your “About This Mac” page simply looks better. But a little flare never hurt anybody, after all.